• Start the session with high energy

 

  • Ensuring there is a clear beginning with an instruction, otherwise the children will not know what to do

 

  • Be assertive while staying playful - the sitter/workshop leader needs to make clear they are in charge

 

  • Being specific and clear on what he/she wants the children to do - Instructions need to be given in vivid language that children can understand (short precise sentences)

 

  • Stay active - Switching between activities quickly is important as the children have short attention spans - If one activity is especially popular, feel free to take a bit longer on it

 

  • If the child looses interest and starts something else, try and integrate their activity into your plan

 

  • Use cues when switching activities e.g. a short song/a quick dance move/clapping a rhythm - children will begin to anticipate the switch and be better prepared

  • Start the session with high energy

 

  • Ensuring there is a clear beginning with an instruction, otherwise the children will not know what to do

 

  • Be assertive while staying playful - the sitter/workshop leader needs to make clear they are in charge

 

  • Be clear and specific

 

 

  • Storytelling can be a great way to keep the child attentive so use it in your activities

 

  • Use colour to keep activities interesting

 

  • Use movement to keep the child focused: hand clapping, foot stomping, running around etc

  • Make the sessions about them by asking for their opinion, or basing activities on things directly relevant to their lives at the moment

 

  • Use culture – through music, fashion, celebrities and other cultural icons, most teens explore and express their identity, these are good conversation starters

 

 

  • Stay active

 

  • Offer choices to give the teen a sense of individuality/independence

 

 

  • Don’t put on an act, be yourself

 

  • Set challenges, this can be a great way to keep the teen engaged